Adaptation issues required increased attention during the formation of the Paris Agreement. With ratification by the European Union, the agreement obtained enough parts to enter into force on 4 November 2016. Unlike the Kyoto Protocol, which set legally binding emission reduction targets (as well as sanctions for non-compliance) only for developed countries, the Paris Agreement requires all countries – rich, poor, developed and developing – to contribute to and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To this end, the Paris Agreement incorporates greater flexibility: there is no language about the commitments countries should make, nations can voluntarily set their emissions targets (NNCs), and countries will not be punished if they fail to meet their proposed targets. But what the Paris Agreement requires is to monitor, report and reassess countries` individual and collective goals over time, in order to bring the world closer to the broader goals of the agreement. And the agreement includes an obligation for countries to announce their next round of targets every five years, unlike the Kyoto Protocol, which aimed at this target but did not contain a specific requirement to achieve it. While the United States and Turkey are not part of the agreement, as countries have not declared their intention to leave the 1992 UNFCCC as “Annex 1” countries, they will continue to be required under the UNFCCC to prepare national communications and an annual greenhouse gas inventory.