The methods of moral reasoning he proposed were divided into three groups known as forms of logical psychological argumentation, rational psychological argument, and non-rational psychological argumentation. [35] Emativism is a metaethic view that asserts that ethical phrases do not express statements, but emotional attitudes. [1] [2] [3] Therefore, it is colloquially called the theory of hurrah/boo. [4] Influenced by the growth of analytic philosophy and logical positivism in the 20th century, the theory of A. J. Ayer was vividly featured in his 1936 book Language, Truth and Logic,[5] but his development owes more to C. L. Stevenson. [6] Philippa Foot takes a morally realistic stance and criticizes the idea that when evaluation is superimposed on facts, there has been a “commitment to a new dimension.” [49] It similarly presents the practical implications of using the word offence. Nothing counts as an injury. There must be a deficiency…