Sometimes the patterns are more complex: some Germanic languages have SOV in subordinate clauses, but word order V2 in main sentences, with SVO word order being the most common. Using the above guidelines, the order of unmarked words is then SVO. Each language has one of six types of word order; The unde fixed type is somewhat controversial in the community because the languages in which it occurs have one of the dominant word orders, but each type of word order is grammatically correct. The fixed word sequence is one of many ways to make it easier to process sentence semantics and reduce ambiguity. One way to make the flow of speech less open to ambiguities (a complete elimination of ambiguity is probably impossible) is a fixed order of arguments and other sentence components. This works because language is inherently linear. Another method is to mark components in one way or another, such.B as with a case marking, match, or other marker. The fixed word sequence reduces expressiveness, but the added mark increases the information load in the speech flow, and for these reasons, a strict word sequence rarely occurs with strict morphological marking, a counter-example is Persian. [1] In (A), the first sentence shows the sequence of words used for questions in English and German. The second sentence is a matter of echo; it would be pronounced only after receiving an unsatisfactory or confusing answer to a question. We could replace the word that [who] (indicating that this sentence is a question) with an identifier like Mark: “Kate loves Mark?” [Kate loves Mark?]. Since in this case there is no change in the sequence of words, we can only identify the sentence as a matter by accent and tone.

The sequence of words in Hungarian sentences is modified according to the speaker`s communicative intentions. The Hungarian word sequence is not free in the sense that it must reflect the information structure of the sentence and distinguish the emphatic part that contains new information (rheme) from the rest of the sentence that contains little or no new information (subject). The subject, verb, and object can come in any order in a Latin sentence, although most often (especially in subordinate clauses) the verb is in last place. [28] Pragmatic factors such as subject matter and orientation play a major role in determining order. . . .